RIP Stereotypes Used to Scapegoat and Deflect

A stereotype being reinforced by those who benefit from blaming borrowers…

revealed by Mandelman Matters and Abigail Field, and what you can do to stop it in its tracks.

Go here.  You really should.  I’m not generally this bossy but you can’t afford to not care.

Your Future Hinges on Just One Thing

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One thought on “RIP Stereotypes Used to Scapegoat and Deflect

  1. I found this parenthetical from a judge in Georgia:
    (This court cannot imagine why U. S. Bank will not make known to Mr. Phillips, a taxpayer, how his numbers put him outside the federal guidelines to receive a loan modification. Taking $20 Billion of taxpayer money was no problem for U. S. Bank. A cynical judge might believe that this entire motion to dismiss is a desperate attempt to avoid the discovery period, where U. S. Bank would have to tell Mr. Phillips how his financial situation did not qualify him for a modification. Or, perhaps he was qualified, yet didn’t receive the modification, in violation of U. S. Bank’s Service Participation Agreement (SPA). A cynical judge might think that, if the guidelines clearly prevented Mr. Phillips from getting his modification, then U. S. Bank would have trotted out that fact in mathematic equations, pie chart, and bar graphs, all on 8 by 10 glossy photo paper, with circles and arrows and paragraphs on the back explaining each winning number. U. S. Bank’s silence on this issue might heighten the suspicions of such a cynical jurist. I, on the other hand, am sure that nothing of the sort could be true. Maybe U. S. Bank no longer has any of the $20 billion dollars left, and so their lack of written explanation might be attributed to some kind of ink reduction program to save money. I’m sure there is a perfectly reasonable explanation for why the U. S. Bank will not print out the ONE page of figures that show Mr. Phillip’s financials compared to the HAMP guidelines to clear all this up.)

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